Showing 10 result(s) for category: geocortex

How to use Geocortex Workflow 5 to populate the Attribute Table in Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS [Geocortex Tech Tip]

One of the things we set out to accomplish with Geocortex Workflow 5 was to dramatically boost efficiency and reduce complexities, ultimately increasing the value of your GIS applications.

In today’s Geocortex Tech Tip, we take a look at how Geocortex Workflow 5 can interact with the Attribute Table widget inside Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS. Using fire hydrant data as an example, you’ll discover how Geocortex Workflow 5 can be used to populate this Attribute Table, simplifying the experience of viewing and comparing your layer data.

 

Watch on YouTube.

Video Transcript

 “Hi everyone, my name is Patrick Fingler. I work in our technical marketing department, and in this video I’m going to show you how you can populate the Attribute Table within Web AppBuilder using Geocortex Workflow 5.

Let’s take a look!

Okay so in this Tech Tip video, I'm going to going to show you how you can populate the Attribute Table within Web AppBuilder using Geocortex Workflow 5. Here you can see I've got a web map displaying within Web AppBuilder that's got some hydrants, it has some service requests, a couple of tax parcels, and often you'll want to have a workflow that presents the user with a form that allows them to search for a layer on the map and then send that information to the attribute table within Web AppBuilder.

In this example I've already built a workflow to accomplish this. It's a pretty simple workflow, and essentially what it's doing is it's presenting the user with a form that is asking them to search for a fire hydrant. They've got two options; they can search for a hydrant by just entering the ID of that particular hydrant, or they can search for hydrants on the map.

So in this example, I might be interested in these three particular hydrants, and if I click ‘Next,’ what we're doing is we're first selecting those hydrants (well, we're actually performing a query on those hydrants), then we're sending the results of that query to the Attribute Table using the ‘Show Results’ activity within workflow 5 and then we're actually panning the map to the extent of these features.

If I wanted to, I could also search by a single Facility ID, and this example again panning to that hydrant and displaying the attributes. 

So let's see how this works in the back end within workflow designer. This is the workflow that I've developed that's being run within Web AppBuilder, and I've deployed to Web AppBuilder and here you can see we've got our initial form here that's just presenting the user with the two options to either search by ID, or search by selection. Then within here, I'm saying if the user clicked submit within that form, we're then going to query for those hydrants.

We'll then switch depending on if the user is selecting them via the geometry, or if they're selecting them by the ID. In this example what I've done is actually dynamically generated the hydrant layer URL and I'll show you how to do that. Then I'm running a query based on the geometry that we selected. Then I'm saying if we got some results - if there's more than one hydrant that we've selected - we're then going to show those results within Web AppBuilder’s Attribute Table. This is the ‘Show Results’ activity that you're going to want to use, and here I'm passing in the features from my query.

Now in order to actually get them to show up and be highlighted within the Attribute Table within Web AppBuilder, you have to pass in a layer ID as well as a layer name.

Now again I'm dynamically getting these values from this hydrant layer and I'll show you how to do that - it's really useful if you're building workflows within Web AppBuilder.

Last but not least, I'm then getting the extent of those features, I'm using this activity, and then I'm setting the map extent to the extent of those features and then I'm expanding it by three. It's zooming out a little bit, and then we're just displaying our final form asking if they want to return to the start, generate a report or exit.

Now I mentioned being able to get the hydrant layer so you can dynamically get the URL, the ID, and the layer name. In order to do this you can use the ‘Get Layer’ activity within workflow 5 and it accepts a layer ID.

For Web App Builder, this layer ID is the name of the layer within the web map itself. So here I can see this is the Web map that I'm using. And this is the name of that. So I've selected that in here.

Once I do that, you'll see I'm getting the layer and these are all of the properties for the layer, so I'm able to retrieve the layer ID. I can even get the layer name as well as the layer URL, and if you're using the secured services you can also retrieve the token as well using this process, so it's a really useful activity. And that's essentially how you dynamically pass that those values into the show results activity as we can see here.

That’s essentially how you can populate the Attribute Table!

Now I also was clearing the Attribute Table as well. In this example I'm still using the layer ID and layer name, but I'm just passing in blank features. So if we rerun this workflow, and search by selection so let's select a couple of these and click “Next,” we can see I’ve selected them. If I click ‘Return to Start,’ I'm then clearing my selection, and if I wanted to generate that final report we can do that by searching for a facility ID and running a report on that. So again that's how you use these show results activity within Workflow 5 to populate the Attribute Table within Web AppBuilder.

Thanks for watching!”

Curious to try Geocortex Workflow 5? Check out our Discovery Center and see everything it has to offer!

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Finding yourself: Using geolocation in mobile and web applications [Webinar]

Finding yourself: Using geolocation in mobile and web applications

We’ve come to expect that the apps we use have a good chance of knowing where we are (with our permission, of course). This technique - known as geolocation - identifies our locations by processing digital information and using either GPS or other related technologies to assess our whereabouts. Whether you are creating a web map application or not, geolocation is an important piece of functionality.

Our Product Development team has been hard at work ensuring that you can quickly and easily add geolocation functionality to all your applications and workflows across platforms. We’re eager to show you just how simple it is!

 

In this developer webinar (or “Devinar,” as we like to call it), Lucas and Matt will explain exactly what geolocation is, how it works, the options available for getting it into your application, their experience implementing it in our next-generation viewers, and the valuable lessons they learned in the process.

If you’re interested in learning more about geolocation and how it can be applied to your applications, watch the devinar below!

 

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Interested in learning more about our next-generation viewers? Contact the Geocortex Team by clicking the button below!

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Enabling real-time user-to-user map collaboration within Geocortex Essentials

Communication can often be a very difficult challenge in a lot of organizations. When it comes to solving these challenges spatially, Geocortex Essentials provides real-time, map-based tools that can streamline the way your processes are being relayed from one user to another, ultimately opening the doors to a more efficient communicative environment.

Our Geocortex Tech Tip explores precisely how this functionality works for both the room administrator and other users in the room. It also shows some of the different ways it can be configured and the various types of user privileges that can be granted. 

 

 

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Video Transcript

“Hi, I’m Ian Sutton and I’m a Geocortex developer. Today I’m going to show you collaboration in Geocortex Viewer for HTML5 2.10.

Let’s jump right in!

For this demo I'll be signed in and to viewers to show multiple users collaborating together on the same map. Now the first thing we want to do when we're using collaboration is sign in. You can't use collaboration unless you're signed in. Now, we're going go to our toolbar and open up collaboration.

First thing we're going see is this big empty space where all of our collaboration content will be. At the top we see a list of rooms that we can join and you can join one or more of these rooms at the same time, and all of the messages will be blended together. But for the purposes of this demonstration we are going to create a new room which we can do with this button here.

So we're going choose a name for our room and you can also choose a color if you don't like the randomly assigned one and you can also manage user access here. but we're going leave that for now. Now that we've created our room, it's going to show up in the room list and we're going to automatically join it and we can go and post some text in our room that will only be visible to people who have joined the room and have permissions to see it. Of course, that doesn't mean much unless we have another user in the room. So, let's go ahead and invite my dummy account. Since right now he can't see it. We're going go to the room list and select this room details menu here and then we're going to hit edit and you can see that it looks very similar to the screen that we had when we were creating the room.

So we're going to look up our dummy account here which is called Web EOC and we're going to add him to our room permissions and you can see we can give him no permissions specifically excluding him if we want to be mean, or we can let him just view the room or we can let him edit the room and we're going to let him edit the rooms so we can have a bit of a conversation then we're going to save so that those changes are registered to the server.

Now you see that on our dummy account here we've got a notification that a new room has been added and we can open up and see that we have access to the test room now. So we're going to open that up!

You can see in our room details that the list of active members has been updated and we can see that Web EOC has joined the test room. And now that we have more than one person in the room, we can see each other's messages, we can share a drawing on the map and we can even post images located to specific points on the map which we can open up and view in our browser. And when we leave the room in question drawings are no longer visible and you can see that our dummy user knows that he's now alone in the room.

So that in a nutshell is collaboration. Thanks for watching!”

Interested in leaning more about the collaboration feature of Geocortex Essentials? Click the button below for additional insight or to schedule a demo.

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Reflecting on 2018

Reflecting on 2018

You might recall that 2018 kicked off with a big announcement from Esri. They made the decision – following feedback they received during the 2017 Esri User Conference – to allow ArcGIS Enterprise customers to add Viewers (Level 1 Named Users) at no additional cost. You might not recall that Level 1 users were first introduced in December of 2016, so perhaps its fitting, following this annual cadence, that we wrap up 2018 with another big announcement from Esri: the introduction of several new User Types

 
  • Viewer (formerly Level 1);  
  • Editor (new);  
  • Field Worker (new);  
  • Creator (formerly Level 2); and  
  • GIS Professional (new).  

These continued, iterative licensing improvements are extremely positive for Esri customers looking to right-size their use of the ArcGIS platform, and come alongside our observation of ever-increasing adoption of Web GIS implementations worldwide. Our impression is that Esri is listening to (and understanding) their customers’ needs. 

Meanwhile, Geocortex Essentials software is in the middle of an evolution, and 2018 has been a big year for the Geocortex Essentials 5-Series, which we introduced with the launch of Geocortex Workflow 5 in mid-2017. This product has enabled our customers to easily automate guided end-user interactions in a SaaS environment. Since then, we’ve been busy building four completely new 5-Series products inspired by capabilities in Geocortex Essentials 4.x: 

  • Geocortex Reporting 5 was released in Junedesigned to help users create production quality, printable reports using spatial and non-spatial data, maps, and charts. We’re thrilled to see customers worldwide adopting the software in both Geocortex Viewer for HTML5 apps, and within Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS® 
  • Geocortex Printing 5 follows in the footsteps of Geocortex Reporting, and will allow you to generate high-quality, high-resolution map print outputs in all sizes. We’re aiming to release the product in February of 2019 
  • Geocortex Web Viewer 5 represents the next generation of HTML viewer technology from Geocortex using Esri’s latest ArcGIS API for JavaScript 4.x, and is currently gearing up for the public beta in JanuaryThis new viewer framework will allow you to create beautiful, fast, flexible applications that can combine the 2D and 3D capabilities of Esri’s latest JavaScript APIs 
  • Geocortex Mobile Viewer 5 will fast become the world’s most capable framework for building mobile, offline, native apps on top of the ArcGIS platform, and the public beta is also scheduled for January 

What’s really cool about the 5-Series is the new patterns we’re seeing customers take advantage of: from using the software entirely in the cloud SaaS environment at apps.geocortex.com or deploying workflows and reports into Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS (Developer Edition). We’ve even seen one of our Belgian partners, SIGGIS, integrate Geocortex Reporting 5 capabilities into ArcGIS Pro! These opportunities come alongside new Geocortex Essentials commercial offerings, which allow you to pick and choose the components and deployment patterns you need for your business or organization. 

With five new products in the 5-Series, two already launched, and three more on the doorstep, we’re thrilled to say that Geocortex Essentials 5 has officially arrived!  

Today, over 1,500 customers use Geocortex Essentials across a broad spectrum of industries and use cases, and we continue to serve those applications by improving Geocortex Essentials 4.x and the popular Geocortex Viewer for HTML5. In the summer, we released a significant performance improvement, resulting in a 50% decrease in startup time across all browsers.  

Hundreds of customers use Geocortex Analytics to monitor the use of their Geocortex applications and their broader GIS infrastructure. In early 2018, we released a major update to the product to improve reliability and include reporting on specific end-user activity. We’re committed to ensuring that Geocortex Essentials 4.x and Geocortex Analytics remain premium software packages for all our customers, in parallel to developments happening in the Geocortex Essentials 5-Series. 

We’ve now drafted our product portfolio strategic plan for 2019: who’s going to work on Project A and Project B and for how long, and when are we going to release Feature X or Feature Y. This time of the year is exciting because we’re charting out the details of our next chapter on our march towards our long-term product vision. As mentioned, we have three major product releases coming in Q1, and you can expect momentum to continue across all 5-Series products, as well as Geocortex Essentials 4.x and Geocortex Analytics. We’re also scheduling sixth 5-Series product planned for Q4  stay tuned for information about that one... for now, we’ll leave you in suspense 😊. 

Here’s wishing you a happy holiday season as we wrap up a terrific 2018 and look forward to another fast-paced and action-packed 2019! 

 


Alberta Energy Regulator: Supporting safe and responsible energy resource operations

Alberta Energy Regulator: Supporting safe and responsible energy resource operations

The Alberta Energy Regulator (AER) is a regulatory body that’s responsible for overseeing oil, oil sands, natural gas, and coral project lifecycles. Their mandate is to provide safe, orderly and efficient development of energy resources across the province of Alberta.

A few years ago, the AER took on the additional task of regulating reclamation and remediation activities for all of Alberta’s energy resource operations, which was previously managed by the Alberta government ministry, Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP).

Taking on this responsibility came with a backlog of nearly 2,700 upstream oil and gas reclamation certificate applications. The backlog was caused due to a very complex process that required each application to be checked against seven different databases – ultimately leading to a significant amount of manual analysis.

 

The AER collaborated with the Geocortex Professional Services team to put together a system called OneStop, a program that ensures all criteria for reclamation are properly vetted in a timely fashion by introducing two review levels (one of which is automated) and freeing the AER of resources which could then be allocated towards more high-risk areas.

As soon as OneStop was launched, roughly 80% of the backlog was processed instantly. By utilizing Geocortex Essentials, AER staff were able to extend their ArcGIS functionality with customizable workflows, tools and features, and configurability with other systems, leading to a massive reduction in production time. Additionally, Geocortex Essentials also enabled the AER to integrate with existing enterprise systems quickly and intuitively.

This process has not only allowed the AER to streamline their processes and improve on transparency, but it also led to them receiving an Esri Canada Award of Excellence for leveraging GIS technology to serve a vital part of Alberta’s economy more efficiently.

Read the full Alberta Energy Regulator customer story here.

 


Important update for ArcGIS and Transport Layer Security (TLS) Protocol Support!

On Thursday, November 15th, you may have received a communication from Esri describing an important update for ArcGIS and Transport Layer Security (TLS) Protocol Support. The details on Esri’s announcement can be viewed here.

The TLS 1.2 requirement enforces strong security practices using the highest industry standards to ensure that your data and network are as secure as possible. Geocortex software (including Geocortex Essentials, Geocortex Analytics and Geocortex 5-series products) provides support for accessing services and content from servers secured with TLS 1.2; however, there are Windows operating system requirements that need to be in place to ensure continued operation of your production applications.

 

On servers where Geocortex software is installed, ensure that all Windows security updates have been applied, and/or you have installed Microsoft .NET Framework 4.6 or newer.

End-users working with Geocortex applications using older browsers (Internet Explorer 9 or 10) must manually update their browser settings to ensure compatibility:

  1. Open IE settings in the top right corner, Internet options.

  2. Select the Advanced tab.

  3. Scroll down to the Security section at the bottom of the list.

  4. Click the option to Use TLS 1.2

  5. Click Apply.
  6. Click OK.

*Tip: You can use this resource to determine if your browser supports TLS 1.2.

If you need help ensuring that your operating system and browser are ready to support TLS 1.2, please contact support at support@geocortex.com.


Using fine-grained security to control access to layers, features, attributes and application functionality [Geocortex Tech Tip]

Geocortex Essentials gives you the ability to tailor your applications to individual users by using fine-grained security to control various elements like layers, features, attributes and other capabilities so users are only seeing the items that you want them to be seeing, and not getting overwhelmed.

In this week’s Geocortex Tech Tip, we take a closer look at the basics of using fine-grained security, and how you can deliver a more personalized experience to your users based on their configured permissions.

 

 

Watch on YouTube.

Video Transcript

“Hi, welcome to Geocortex Tech Tips. My name is Jonathan and today we’re going to be talking about using fine-grained security to control access to layers, features, attributes and application functionality.

Let’s get started!

Here I've got essentials manager open, and I'm going to go to my site and edit its configuration. On the side panel here we can see the permissions tab which is where you go to configure these fine-grained settings. Here you'll see a tree of all of the items included in the site, and each item has a Tri-State check box beside it, which we can turn to deny, allow or inherit, where it will inherit the settings from the item in the tree above it that is set.

Up at the top we'll have a list of the security providers you can configure. For example, ArcGIS online - your organizational account, all users, by group, by organization or organization role. If you pull up one of these, you'll also have to enter the group that you are interested in and there should be a nice dropdown list there. Once you select the group you can go ahead and configure permissions for that particular group.

Let's go back to anonymous here.

First thing - why don't we deny access to the site completely for anonymous users? We'll say you have to be a member of our ArcGIS Online organization to get in. Now there's nothing in this site that secured that would apply the security on its own, but once we have that set in Essentials Manager, now there will be a log in required to view this.

Let's reload our site. We can see the site, but that is because I was automatically signed in, so I'll sign out, and I have to sign in again. There is no way to see this site without being signed in.

Okay so that's pretty basic. Let's look at layers. We can see at the top level under ‘Map,’ we'll have our map service level objects and then under that the layer objects. Now for a feature layer, there's only one layer with the one service level object so it doesn't really matter which you secure. But if you're talking about a dynamic map service you might have more than one layer, so you can choose to secure the whole map service or individual layers, within group layers, etc.

Let’s go back to our heliports layer here, and I'm not going to let the anonymous people see this layer. They can get into the site, but they can't see this layer and you're going to have to be a member of our organization. Don't care who you are, just that you're a member and you're allowed to see it.

Okay, let’s see how that works. So, we'll sign out again now. And now, the site loads up, we can see that that heliports layer is gone, and it is no longer included in the layer list.

Let’s sign in. And it's back!

So, we can also secure the fields on our layer. I might say that all of these fields (there are quite a few fields here) are not necessary for every user to see or maybe you're only going to make them all available to GIS professionals that are in a certain group. So even though we can see this layer as a member of our organization, we're going to turn off some of these fields (in fact we're going to turn off most of them). Notice I don't have to allow the fields that I want to allow, I just have to deny the fields that I want to deny, because these will inherit the allow permission from here. So, let's see that.

First of all, we'll just identify a few of these, just so we can see that all the fields are here right now. And there they are!

Okay so let's reload the site, now we're signed out. There's no layer at all. We'll sign in, the layer is here. But if I identify these features and I take a look only the four fields that I allowed are available. Cool! So what else can you do?

One thing I should point out about fields first before I move on, is that to configure the fields here you do have to first go here, find the layer with the fields on it that you want to configure, and you need to make sure all of the fields have been added here and that they're not just visible because they're configured default visible - they have to be added on this page, and then they will become available on this page to secure.

Let's take a look at some more things that we might deny to anonymous users. We have layer themes, so maybe we don't want them to switch to those layer theme, so we can turn them off. We can also secure print templates and other items that are configured in the site like workflows. Let's see what happens with those layer themes.

Right now if I go in here and I look at my layer list, I am signed in but you can see I have some themes available now. I’ll reload.

Now I do want to be signed out and then if I look, I find that ‘All Available Layers’ is the only theme that I can pick. Were you to turn off the option to show all available layers in the theme settings for this viewer, this drop-box would not be here either. But then when we sign in, we'll find that we again have access to all of the layer themes and we can turn them on like so.

The last thing on the list that I probably should mention is that you can secure individual viewers. You can see I only have one viewer in this site, so I can't turn this one off, or anonymous access will not be allowed at all and it will be like this viewer doesn't exist. Since I don't have any other viewers to load, if I turn that one off for anonymous users then - if they're not already logged in somehow - it's like that viewer no longer exists.

And you can see I couldn't find it. It just loaded the default viewer. So, a little bit of a difference there between securing the viewer and securing the site. If you secure the site, the viewer will still load and give you the opportunity to log in but if you secure viewer there's no way to even load the viewer.

So that is the basics of using fine-grained security. I hope you have fun with this feature and happy hacking on Geocortex!”

Learn how Geocortex Essentials can help your organization solve business challenges. Check out the Discovery Center to get a feel for the product.

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Enhancing Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS® with Geocortex Reporting [Webinar]

We’ve been hard at work developing ways in which Web AppBuilder can be augmented using Geocortex Reporting 5, one of our powerful 5-Series products that can be used within Esri’s Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS®. This technology delivers high quality, configurable reports that meet the needs of your end users, and we're excited to show you how it's done!

 

In the webinar below, we examine how Geocortex Reporting 5 enables you to streamline the way you gather, organize and share data through these powerful reports.

The webinar also includes an example of how the Massachusetts Department of Transportation used Geocortex Reporting 5 to consume data from multiple sources, including ArcGIS Server and SQL Server, to produce a robust and high-performing report for use in Web AppBuilder® for ArcGIS.

View our “Enhancing Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS® with Geocortex Reporting” below!

 

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Want to know more about Geocortex Reporting and it's capabilities? Click the button below to learn more and schedule a demo!

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Using Geocortex Workflow 5 to automatically display a form for editing layer attributes [Geocortex Tech Tip]

With Geocortex Workflow 5, authoring workflows has never been easier. With a library of 170 pre-built activities that chain together seamlessly, you can covert even the most sophisticated business processes into a simple, guided end-user experience.

One of the things that we’re really proud of when it comes to Workflow 5 is its ability to automate virtually any task, so we thought it would be fitting to show you in this week’s Geocortex Tech Tip how to use our Workflow technology to automatically display a form for editing layer attributes.

 

Watch on YouTube.

Video Transcript

“Hi, my name’s Jeff. I’m a software developer on Geocortex Workflow 5, and today I’m going to show you how to display a form using Workflow so that you can edit features in your layer.

Let’s get started!

So, I’m going to demo this for you today in the new Geocortex Mobile Viewer which means the Esri objects that we’re interacting with in this workflow are going to be from the ArcGIS .NET Runtime, so you might notice a few slight differences form the JavaScript API. So, to show our form we are going to use a display form activity, and I’ve gone ahead and preconfigured some activities for this workflow just to save time.

On our display form activity, we’re not going to configure any form elements and that is because we want to dynamically display the form depending on the layer that we have. To set the dynamic form elements we’re going to use the ‘load’ event handler in the forms header. If we look in here the first thing, we need to do is get the layer using the ‘Get Layer’ activity and I’m going to be using a web map that has a layer with the ID ‘Service_Request_8759’. That’s going to get our layer and the next thing we’re going to want to do is add a form element for each field in the layer. So, we’re going to iterate over the fields in the layer. You can see we’re going layer.featureTable.fields and this feature table is a .NETism.

The first thing we’re going to do on our ‘For Each’ loop is just assign the field to a variable, so that we don’t have to access each For Each loop current item every time so this is a Create Value activity. Then the next thing we want to do is check if the field is editable, so we’re going to check the ‘isEditable’ property. If it’s not editable then we’re not going do anything because we don’t want to display anything.

So, then we’re going to create an object for our form element and we’re going to assign a few properties we’re going to set the description to the field alias and I’m going to set the items to an empty object, which I’ll come back to in a few minutes. Next, we want to decide which kind of view UI control to create for each field.

The first case we’re going to handle is fields that have coded value domains so in this if activity we’re checking if the field has a domain object and if that domain object has coded values. If it does then we’re going to want to show a dropdown box with the coded value domains in it. So were going to iterate over the coded value domains so you can see ‘domain.codedValues’ in our For Each loop here. And the first thing we’re going to do in here is just assign the coded value to the variable, so we don’t have to access the For Each loop every time and we’re going to create an object for the form item.

The ‘label’ is going to be the name of the coded value and the ‘value’ is going to be the value of the coded value. And then we’re going to set this item on our form element object. As you can see, I’m targeting the items property of the form element object. And we have to assign it a unique ID so we’re just going to use the pass of the For Each activity and we’re going to call toString on it because it has to be a string ID, and we’re going to pass in the object we just created. Next, we’re going to add the dropdown list form item to our form and we’re going to do this using the ‘Add Form Element’ activity. We have to provide a unique ID, so we’re going to use the name of the field and we have to specify the type of form element that we want to use (you should get some intellisense in here), we want to use a dropdown list and we’re going to put in our form element object that we just created.

Next, I’m going to show you how to do a number field. So, for this we have to look at the fieldType property of the field and in .NET, this is a numeration that is backed by integers, so we just have to compare it to its integer value, so the value for an integer is one. So, we want to create a format object for our number to ensure it appears as an integer - so to do this we set the precision to ‘0’, meaning no decimal places are shown and we want to set the step to ‘1’.

Next, we want to set our format object that we just created on the form element object, so we’re setting the format property on our form element object to the format object that we just created. Once again, we’re going to use the Add Form Element activity to add this to our form. This time we’re going to chose number and we’re going to use the field name as the ID. So next I’m going to show you a string field. So, the integer value of field type for a string is ‘7’, so we’re just checking for a ‘7’ so in that case we want to add a TextArea form element to our form. So, it’s the simplest case using the field name again.

Alright, I’m going to demo this for you in the Geocortex Mobile Viewer now.

Let’s quickly take a look at the Json in the feature layer that I’m using here. These are the fields in the feature layer, and you can see I have a string field called ‘REQUESTSTATUS’ that uses some coded value domains; there’s three domains in there. I’ve got a regular string field called ‘DESCRIPTION’ and an integer field named ‘SEVERITY’. So, this the workflow that we made to show the form elements will cover all three of these fields.

Let’s pop open Geocortex Mobile Viewer and I’ll show you the workflow. So, this is just an extremely bare bones version of the mobile viewer that I’ve configured solely for the purpose of showing you this workflow. So, I have the workflow on the task bar and if I click on it, you’ll see that I’ll get one form element for each of the fields that are editable. So, I’ve got my ‘Status’ element which is a dropdown box. I can choose the value, the ‘Description’ field is just a string field, and the ‘Severity’ field is just an integer. So, if I type in that I can see that it is an integer and I can step up my integer values.

And that’s how we create a dynamic form for a given layer. Thanks for watching!”

Interested in trying Geocortex Workflow 5 for yourself? Check out our Discovery Center and explore everything Geocortex Workflow 5 has to offer!

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Geocortex Achieves Esri’s “Release Ready Specialty” Designation

Geocortex Achieves Esri's "Release Ready Specialty" Designation

We are thrilled to announce that Geocortex has been officially designated by Esri as a Release Ready Specialty partner!

The Release Ready Specialty certification recognizes companies approved by Esri who are constantly keeping pace with their technology, have strong industry expertise, offer solutions, services or content based on the latest Esri software releases, and help users make smarter overall decisions using the ArcGIS® platform.

 

We want our customers to feel like they’ve made the most of their investment in Esri, and a major part of that is ensuring that they are always aligned and optimized with Esri’s constantly-evolving technology. By working closely with Esri, Geocortex has provided compatible software with every major and minor release of ArcGIS within 10 business days of general availability since the release of ArcGIS 9.3. Further, Geocortex ensures customers can take advantage of new patterns, APIs and platforms that evolve as part of Esri’s development of ArcGIS.

Geocortex Essentials Enables Technology Change

As we look towards 2019, we are ensuring that Geocortex Essentials 5-Series software -- including Geocortex Workflow, Geocortex Reporting, and Geocortex Printing (coming soon) -- is ready for ArcGIS 10.7. Simultaneously, we are excited to unveil a new Geocortex Mobile Viewer based on the latest ArcGIS Runtime SDK for .NET, and a new Geocortex Web Viewer built on ArcGIS API for JavaScript 4.x in the coming months.

Stay tuned!