Showing 8 result(s) for category: geocortex workflow

How to use Geocortex Workflow 5 to populate the Attribute Table in Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS [Geocortex Tech Tip]

One of the things we set out to accomplish with Geocortex Workflow 5 was to dramatically boost efficiency and reduce complexities, ultimately increasing the value of your GIS applications.

In today’s Geocortex Tech Tip, we take a look at how Geocortex Workflow 5 can interact with the Attribute Table widget inside Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS. Using fire hydrant data as an example, you’ll discover how Geocortex Workflow 5 can be used to populate this Attribute Table, simplifying the experience of viewing and comparing your layer data.

 

Watch on YouTube.

Video Transcript

 “Hi everyone, my name is Patrick Fingler. I work in our technical marketing department, and in this video I’m going to show you how you can populate the Attribute Table within Web AppBuilder using Geocortex Workflow 5.

Let’s take a look!

Okay so in this Tech Tip video, I'm going to going to show you how you can populate the Attribute Table within Web AppBuilder using Geocortex Workflow 5. Here you can see I've got a web map displaying within Web AppBuilder that's got some hydrants, it has some service requests, a couple of tax parcels, and often you'll want to have a workflow that presents the user with a form that allows them to search for a layer on the map and then send that information to the attribute table within Web AppBuilder.

In this example I've already built a workflow to accomplish this. It's a pretty simple workflow, and essentially what it's doing is it's presenting the user with a form that is asking them to search for a fire hydrant. They've got two options; they can search for a hydrant by just entering the ID of that particular hydrant, or they can search for hydrants on the map.

So in this example, I might be interested in these three particular hydrants, and if I click ‘Next,’ what we're doing is we're first selecting those hydrants (well, we're actually performing a query on those hydrants), then we're sending the results of that query to the Attribute Table using the ‘Show Results’ activity within workflow 5 and then we're actually panning the map to the extent of these features.

If I wanted to, I could also search by a single Facility ID, and this example again panning to that hydrant and displaying the attributes. 

So let's see how this works in the back end within workflow designer. This is the workflow that I've developed that's being run within Web AppBuilder, and I've deployed to Web AppBuilder and here you can see we've got our initial form here that's just presenting the user with the two options to either search by ID, or search by selection. Then within here, I'm saying if the user clicked submit within that form, we're then going to query for those hydrants.

We'll then switch depending on if the user is selecting them via the geometry, or if they're selecting them by the ID. In this example what I've done is actually dynamically generated the hydrant layer URL and I'll show you how to do that. Then I'm running a query based on the geometry that we selected. Then I'm saying if we got some results - if there's more than one hydrant that we've selected - we're then going to show those results within Web AppBuilder’s Attribute Table. This is the ‘Show Results’ activity that you're going to want to use, and here I'm passing in the features from my query.

Now in order to actually get them to show up and be highlighted within the Attribute Table within Web AppBuilder, you have to pass in a layer ID as well as a layer name.

Now again I'm dynamically getting these values from this hydrant layer and I'll show you how to do that - it's really useful if you're building workflows within Web AppBuilder.

Last but not least, I'm then getting the extent of those features, I'm using this activity, and then I'm setting the map extent to the extent of those features and then I'm expanding it by three. It's zooming out a little bit, and then we're just displaying our final form asking if they want to return to the start, generate a report or exit.

Now I mentioned being able to get the hydrant layer so you can dynamically get the URL, the ID, and the layer name. In order to do this you can use the ‘Get Layer’ activity within workflow 5 and it accepts a layer ID.

For Web App Builder, this layer ID is the name of the layer within the web map itself. So here I can see this is the Web map that I'm using. And this is the name of that. So I've selected that in here.

Once I do that, you'll see I'm getting the layer and these are all of the properties for the layer, so I'm able to retrieve the layer ID. I can even get the layer name as well as the layer URL, and if you're using the secured services you can also retrieve the token as well using this process, so it's a really useful activity. And that's essentially how you dynamically pass that those values into the show results activity as we can see here.

That’s essentially how you can populate the Attribute Table!

Now I also was clearing the Attribute Table as well. In this example I'm still using the layer ID and layer name, but I'm just passing in blank features. So if we rerun this workflow, and search by selection so let's select a couple of these and click “Next,” we can see I’ve selected them. If I click ‘Return to Start,’ I'm then clearing my selection, and if I wanted to generate that final report we can do that by searching for a facility ID and running a report on that. So again that's how you use these show results activity within Workflow 5 to populate the Attribute Table within Web AppBuilder.

Thanks for watching!”

Curious to try Geocortex Workflow 5? Check out our Discovery Center and see everything it has to offer!

Discover Geocortex Workflow 5


Using Geocortex Workflow 5 to automatically display a form for editing layer attributes [Geocortex Tech Tip]

With Geocortex Workflow 5, authoring workflows has never been easier. With a library of 170 pre-built activities that chain together seamlessly, you can covert even the most sophisticated business processes into a simple, guided end-user experience.

One of the things that we’re really proud of when it comes to Workflow 5 is its ability to automate virtually any task, so we thought it would be fitting to show you in this week’s Geocortex Tech Tip how to use our Workflow technology to automatically display a form for editing layer attributes.

 

Watch on YouTube.

Video Transcript

“Hi, my name’s Jeff. I’m a software developer on Geocortex Workflow 5, and today I’m going to show you how to display a form using Workflow so that you can edit features in your layer.

Let’s get started!

So, I’m going to demo this for you today in the new Geocortex Mobile Viewer which means the Esri objects that we’re interacting with in this workflow are going to be from the ArcGIS .NET Runtime, so you might notice a few slight differences form the JavaScript API. So, to show our form we are going to use a display form activity, and I’ve gone ahead and preconfigured some activities for this workflow just to save time.

On our display form activity, we’re not going to configure any form elements and that is because we want to dynamically display the form depending on the layer that we have. To set the dynamic form elements we’re going to use the ‘load’ event handler in the forms header. If we look in here the first thing, we need to do is get the layer using the ‘Get Layer’ activity and I’m going to be using a web map that has a layer with the ID ‘Service_Request_8759’. That’s going to get our layer and the next thing we’re going to want to do is add a form element for each field in the layer. So, we’re going to iterate over the fields in the layer. You can see we’re going layer.featureTable.fields and this feature table is a .NETism.

The first thing we’re going to do on our ‘For Each’ loop is just assign the field to a variable, so that we don’t have to access each For Each loop current item every time so this is a Create Value activity. Then the next thing we want to do is check if the field is editable, so we’re going to check the ‘isEditable’ property. If it’s not editable then we’re not going do anything because we don’t want to display anything.

So, then we’re going to create an object for our form element and we’re going to assign a few properties we’re going to set the description to the field alias and I’m going to set the items to an empty object, which I’ll come back to in a few minutes. Next, we want to decide which kind of view UI control to create for each field.

The first case we’re going to handle is fields that have coded value domains so in this if activity we’re checking if the field has a domain object and if that domain object has coded values. If it does then we’re going to want to show a dropdown box with the coded value domains in it. So were going to iterate over the coded value domains so you can see ‘domain.codedValues’ in our For Each loop here. And the first thing we’re going to do in here is just assign the coded value to the variable, so we don’t have to access the For Each loop every time and we’re going to create an object for the form item.

The ‘label’ is going to be the name of the coded value and the ‘value’ is going to be the value of the coded value. And then we’re going to set this item on our form element object. As you can see, I’m targeting the items property of the form element object. And we have to assign it a unique ID so we’re just going to use the pass of the For Each activity and we’re going to call toString on it because it has to be a string ID, and we’re going to pass in the object we just created. Next, we’re going to add the dropdown list form item to our form and we’re going to do this using the ‘Add Form Element’ activity. We have to provide a unique ID, so we’re going to use the name of the field and we have to specify the type of form element that we want to use (you should get some intellisense in here), we want to use a dropdown list and we’re going to put in our form element object that we just created.

Next, I’m going to show you how to do a number field. So, for this we have to look at the fieldType property of the field and in .NET, this is a numeration that is backed by integers, so we just have to compare it to its integer value, so the value for an integer is one. So, we want to create a format object for our number to ensure it appears as an integer - so to do this we set the precision to ‘0’, meaning no decimal places are shown and we want to set the step to ‘1’.

Next, we want to set our format object that we just created on the form element object, so we’re setting the format property on our form element object to the format object that we just created. Once again, we’re going to use the Add Form Element activity to add this to our form. This time we’re going to chose number and we’re going to use the field name as the ID. So next I’m going to show you a string field. So, the integer value of field type for a string is ‘7’, so we’re just checking for a ‘7’ so in that case we want to add a TextArea form element to our form. So, it’s the simplest case using the field name again.

Alright, I’m going to demo this for you in the Geocortex Mobile Viewer now.

Let’s quickly take a look at the Json in the feature layer that I’m using here. These are the fields in the feature layer, and you can see I have a string field called ‘REQUESTSTATUS’ that uses some coded value domains; there’s three domains in there. I’ve got a regular string field called ‘DESCRIPTION’ and an integer field named ‘SEVERITY’. So, this the workflow that we made to show the form elements will cover all three of these fields.

Let’s pop open Geocortex Mobile Viewer and I’ll show you the workflow. So, this is just an extremely bare bones version of the mobile viewer that I’ve configured solely for the purpose of showing you this workflow. So, I have the workflow on the task bar and if I click on it, you’ll see that I’ll get one form element for each of the fields that are editable. So, I’ve got my ‘Status’ element which is a dropdown box. I can choose the value, the ‘Description’ field is just a string field, and the ‘Severity’ field is just an integer. So, if I type in that I can see that it is an integer and I can step up my integer values.

And that’s how we create a dynamic form for a given layer. Thanks for watching!”

Interested in trying Geocortex Workflow 5 for yourself? Check out our Discovery Center and explore everything Geocortex Workflow 5 has to offer!

Discover Geocortex Workflow


How to access a SQL database from a workflow using Geocortex Workflow 5 [Geocortex Tech Tip]

How to access a SQL database from a workflow using Geocortex Workflow 5

There are a lot of benefits when it comes to server workflows, a new type of workflow available for users of the newly released, on-premises version of Geocortex Workflow. Server workflows can read and write files that exist on the server, send emails (as Noah demonstrated last week), run Python scripts, send HTTP requests to secured web services that the end user can’t reach from their browser, and carry out some other heavy-duty types of processing requests.

In this week’s Geocortex Tech Tip, we wanted to show you yet another feature exclusive to server workflows that we’re really excited about: Accessing a SQL database from a workflow. By calling a server workflow to do a SQL database query, the server workflow returns a data structure to the client, enabling it for use with a workflow.

 

Check out the video below to learn how this process works!

 

Watch on YouTube

Video Transcript

“Hi, I’m Ryan. I’m on the Geocortex Workflow development team. Today I’d like to show you how to query a SQL database in Geocortex Workflow 5. Let’s take a look!

I have a workflow here and it’s really simple, it has to display form activity and it has a drop-down list asking to pick or select a customer from a list. Now this list (at the moment) is just a hard-coded list of options, but I would like this list to be populated from a database. It’s something that we can normally do through an ArcGIS query, but that’s using the ArcGIS REST API to perform that query. If we want to go direct to the database, that’s something that hasn’t been possible until today inside Workflow and we’re going to use a new features called Server Workflows that are available in Workflow 5.8 and the on-premises version of Workflow.

What this is going to allow us to do is create a whole new type of workflow that is going to run on the server and it’s going to do our work to actually query the database for us. It will have access to activities that can query the database and then it will return us some results so that my client workflow, the workflow the end user is interacting with, can basically call the server workflow as if it were a web service. So, what we’re going to do is create a brand-new workflow and this is going to be my server workflow and I’m actually going to tell it that it’s a server workflow by switching to the info panel and selecting ‘Server Workflow’. This is going to change the toolbox to have a different set of activities that are available and some of the really powerful ones here are the SQL query activities.

So, the SQL query activity - a connection string - is going to allow me to define my query. I’ve set one up in advance here so I’m going to just populate the providers, this is going to be a SQL server database. I’m going to plug in a connection string, this is just some database sitting on the internet that we can use. I’ll quickly show you this table. It’s just a Microsoft Northwind database. There’s a customer table and it’s got a contact name field, and this field is what I want to populate my results with.

I’m going to run this query, and this is going to provide a data table output and what I want is this server workflow to provide that data table as the output to the workflow itself. There’s an activity called ‘Set Workflow Output’ and I can provide whatever name I like for this output, so I’m going to call it ‘contacts’ and the value is going to be sqlQuery1.dataTable, so just the result of that data table. When I save this, I’m going to call this ‘Customer Server Workflow’.

Okay, so my server-side part is done - it’s going to do a query and is going to return that data table as adjacent data structure to this client workflow and the client workflow - rather than using this manual list of options in that drop down - I’m going to change to use a sub workflow and I’m going to just start with a blank one.

Now in this, I want to run that server workflow, so there’s a run workflow activity, and I need to give it a URL. If I go back to my server workflow on the info panel, I can copy the URL, paste that in. That workflow didn’t have any inputs or arguments, so I don’t need to supply any, but it is going to provide a result and then what I want to do is I want to take that result - which will have a data table on it - and convert that data table into something that the form is going to be able to use. There’s an activity called ‘Get Form Element Items From Collection’ which will do that. So, the collection in this case is going to be my runWorkflow1 result, and contacts was the name of the property that I had assigned on that so we’re going to take that contacts collection, and I’m going to provide the name and value of that dropdown list (I’m going use the same field).

The last thing we need to do here is set form element items, so we have to actually tell the dropdown list to use these items. If I save that I should be able to run that.

I’ll just run this in the sandbox and there we go! I’ve got my list that’s coming from the database and if I pick a value and submit it, the reminder of my workflow is just to alert that value back, but we can now go on and do something really useful with that.

So, there you have it, we were able to create a client workflow running in the web browser. It calls a server workflow when it needs to do something server specific like do a SQL database query or send an email or some kind of server processing. That server workflow returns a data structure to the client and then the client is able to use that and carry on with that workflow.

So that’s how you do a query SQL database inside Workflow 5!”

Geocortex Workflow can extend your Web AppBuilder applications by turning even the most sophisticated business processes into a set of simple, guided end-user interactions. Check out our Discovery Center and explore everything Geocortex Workflow 5 has to offer! 

Discover Geocortex Workflow


How to send an email from a workflow using Geocortex Workflow 5 [Geocortex Tech Tip]

How to send an email from a workflow using Geocortex Workflow 5

November is an exciting month here at Geocortex, as we’re thrilled to announce the release of the on-premises version of Geocortex Workflow!

To commemorate this release, we thought it would be very fitting to have our next few rounds of Geocortex Tech Tips focus on our Workflow technology.

 

One of the key new features that the on-premises version supports is a new type of workflow called “server workflow”. These workflows execute on the server as a web service, compared to normal workflows that execute in the end user’s web browser, meaning that server workflows ultimately have access to resources that otherwise couldn’t be reached from a web browser.

An example of one of these resources – and where we thought we’d focus this week’s Geocortex Tech Tip on – is how to send an email with an attachment using this new server workflow. These emails can include multiple recipients including both CC’s, BCC’s. Check out the video below to learn how it works!

 

Watch on YouTube.

Video Transcript:

“Hi, I’m Noah and I work on the Products team. Today we’re going to learn how to send an email with the on-premise version of Geocortex Workflow 5. Let’s take a look! 

So, today we’re going to learn how to create a server workflow that can send an email to a user with an attachment.  

Right in front of me I have a client workflow which asks the workflow runner for a username and an email address and then runs a server workflow which is going to send our email for us.  

Over here I have the server work form running. Right now what this server work flow does is it gets the workflow inputs with that username and email address, and it reads a data file for us. The data file is just some csv data that we're going to put in our email as an attachment. 

The first thing we want to do is create the attachment to put on to the email. The content of the attachment is going to be our file. It’s going to be the bytes from Read File Bytes. Our content type is going to be text/csv since we’re reading since we have a csv file, and our file name is going to be data.csv. This produces an attachment object and as you can see here, 'This object should be passed to the Send Email activity’, so that is what we are going to sue next.  

The send email activity has a To, a From, a CC, and a BCC, and the To, the CC and the BCC can all take either one value or an array of multiple values. For the value of To, I’m going to just use one value which came from our client workflow; it is going to be the username. Let's look for the user’s email. It's called email.  

Now From, let’s use my own email. For CC, let’s CC a couple people just to show how the array works. I'm going to create a new array with the equal sign and then a square bracket and lets CC ‘techtips@latitudegeo.com' and ‘anotherDeveloper@latitudegeo.com'. You could add as many emails as you like to the CC, the BCC, or the To fields on the send email activity. Let's leave the BCC empty. Let’s make our subject ‘Email techtip. Now the email body can either be an html body or just plain text. Let's make it some html.  

First, let make a header. And let's make the header say ‘The Data’. Then, let’s make a paragraph and let’s address our user. We’re going to grab the user input we got from earlier. We’re going to go to the inputs, and we’re going to get the user field. Let’s end our paragraph and end our string. Here’s a little html body with some user input writing here. Now one important thing to know is that it can be dangerous to let users input their own information into an html string, so what I did in the client workflow is I made sure to escape the user input and make it safe. Let’s go back and see that.  

The users input, prompt1.result is passed into the encodeHtml function. This function ensures the users input is safe to put in an html string.  

Now that I have the body all set up, let’s attach my attachment from earlier. And then, let’s say true to Is Body Html, so the email will actually render it as html and not plain text. Let's save our server workflow, and let's go back to the client workflow, and let's run it in the sandbox!  

Let's send the email to myself (just cause then I can open it and we can see). The email got sent! Let’s go and check my inbox and see what’s there. There it is, 2:37pm! Here’s the html heading that got rendered. My name got injected right in here, and the data got attached and we see CC’d techtips@latitudegeo.com', ‘anotherDeveloper@latitudegeo.com', and it’s to me and it is from me. Let’s open up the data and just show that it got transferred correctly. Yup, that looks all good.  

So that is how you send an email using Geocortex workflow 5 and the on-premise server addition of Geocortex Workflow.” 

Geocortex Workflow can extend your Web AppBuilder applications by turning even the most sophisticated business processes into a set of simple, guided end-user interactions. Check out our Discovery Center and explore everything Geocortex Workflow 5 has to offer! 

Discover Geocortex Workflow


Build custom activities with the new SDK for Geocortex Workflow 5

It’s now been a few months since we officially launched Geocortex Workflow 5, and it’s great to see our users building some innovative apps with Geocortex and Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS®!

One thing that we’ve been hearing, though, is that developers want the ability to apply their own code in the workflows they’re building.

As of version 5.2 (released a few weeks ago), Geocortex Workflow 5 now offers a software development kit (SDK) for building custom workflow activities. The SDK is TypeScript-based, allowing you to write your own custom code to run in workflows, with your builds producing the JavaScript required to execute the activities at runtime.

So, what are “activities”? In the simplest terms, they’re the building blocks of a workflow - each activity represents a unit of work. Geocortex Workflow 5 offers more than 150 pre-built activities that chain together to automate almost any task. Activities such as geocode, query layer, set the map extent, get user info, calculate distance, buffer geometry, run geoprocessing, and so many more allow you to streamline even the most complex GIS and business tasks.

Flex your development chops and write activities to perform tasks that weren’t previously possible – or were extremely complex to assemble with pre-built activities. You can combine your programming skills with Geocortex Workflow’s intuitive, activity-based design to build powerful applications.

Custom activities can be built for yourself, or for others in your organization; even non-developers can work with activities as they would any others in Geocortex Workflow Designer. And granted that your technology of choice supports the functionality you’re building, custom activities can be consumed in Geocortex and/or Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS applications.

Take Geocortex Workflow 5 even further

While most tasks can be automated with the pre-built, out-of-the-box (OOTB) activities offered with Geocortex Workflow 5, you can now build anything you want with the SDK. Custom integrations, talking to custom web services, connecting with 3rd party APIs, and interfacing with custom code in your existing apps are now all possible.

Here are a few examples of what you can do with custom activities:

  • Perhaps you want to integrate with a 3rd party system like SAP®. While this is possible with pre-built activities, you’ll be manually assembling workflow logic to make the web requests, parse the responses, and execute your business logic. With the latest updates, you can achieve a result that’s more clean, efficient, and consumable by wrapping the logic in a few simple custom activities.
  • Many common tasks are time-consuming to build – maybe you find yourself using the same pattern over and over in one workflow. Instead of following this repetitive pattern, you can bundle all the logic within a single custom activity. An example might be sorting map features by multiple columns. Pre-built activities are available that will sort data by one column, but it’s more efficient to write a custom activity to sort by multiple columns than it is to link activity after activity – especially if you need to perform these tasks across multiple applications and workflows.
  • At the more complex end of the spectrum, you can build custom user interfaces using React (a leading JavaScript library for building user interfaces). This is the most challenging to achieve, but if you’re up for the challenge, it provides complete flexibility. If you’re thinking of doing this, we recommend chatting with us beforehand - we want to help make sure you’re on the right path.

Set a standard

Unless your organization follows strict guidelines for building custom apps and widgets, there is always the risk that developers will use different patterns and approaches to develop custom code. This makes it difficult for others to maintain or update the code; it can be a bit like the wild west.

This can be mitigated with Geocortex Workflow 5’s custom activities. All activities have the same, simple signature of inputs, outputs, and an execute method. Following the activity-based pattern ensures you have a standard practice for building custom logic.

With activities, you are implementing a unit of work rather than a large, rigid solution. This promotes reusability and your code will be easier to write, interpret, test, and maintain. Any developer will be able to pick up your custom activities and understand how to work with them.

You can also control how custom activities are presented to other users in the browser-based Geocortex Workflow Designer. They can be configured to look like the existing OOTB activities, helping ensure a consistent pattern across your apps.

Custom activities in Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS®

At Latitude Geographics, we’ve always built complementary technology to help our customers accomplish even more with Esri’s ArcGIS platform. With Geocortex Workflow 5, we’ve taken this to a new level by allowing you to build workflows that run inside Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS.

If you’re using Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS, creating custom activities with Geocortex Workflow 5 is still the preferred alternative to writing a bunch of custom widgets. Initial deployment will require a similar amount of effort, but ongoing maintenance and modifications of custom activities require significantly less time (and pain!).

If you write a custom widget for Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS and want to deploy it to multiple apps, you need to edit the source code in all the applications using that widget each time a modification is required. With Geocortex Workflow 5, the custom code is packaged in an activity, and you only need to modify the source activity for changes to be applied across all your applications.

Learn more about deploying workflows inside Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS in the Geocortex Workflow Discovery Center.

Start building today

You can access the SDK in our Documentation Center. Just look for the .zip file that contains all the necessary instructions you need to get started.

Let us know how it goes

As you get going with the new SDK, we want to hear your feedback. If you have questions, comments, or concerns, please get in touch with us to let us know.

We’d also love it if you share what you’re building with us and other users in the Geocortex Workflow Community. This is a great place to connect with other users - everyone benefits from sharing tips, tricks, and sample workflows.

Happy building!

 


Geocortex Essentials 4.3, Geocortex Viewer for HTML5 2.4 & Geocortex Mobile App Framework 1.2

Latest Geocortex release includes most feature-rich HTML5 viewer ever, accessibility for end-users with disabilities, inclusion of Android devices for offline scenarios

Latitude Geographics has released Geocortex Essentials 4.3, alongside Geocortex Viewer for HTML5 2.4 and Geocortex Mobile App Framework 1.2.

This release contains so many features and improvements that we got our customers involved early. We ran a month-long beta program and close to 200 customers provided their feedback to help us improve the quality of our software: thank you to everyone who participated… your input is extremely appreciated!

Geocortex Essentials has made some major improvements under the hood to improve performance. Instant Search – which allows you to scan across millions of indexed records – has been updated, and new Workflow activities are available to help streamline and automate even the most complex business processes. We’ve also included support for KML layers and folder configuration options with the help of icons and radio buttons.

The biggest news, however, is the huge leap we’ve taken with Geocortex Viewer for HTML5. We’ve added over 20 significant new capabilities and several enhancements, with a dedicated focus on improving user experiences across devices and in any environment. An optional compact toolbar, improved feature details, and drill-down map tips are available for all devices, and handheld devices have a brand new UX and UI. We’ve also helped make maps more accessible to end-users with disabilities by ensuring that all out-of-the-box tools and features are Web Content Accessibility Guideline (WCAG) 2.0 AA compliant.

Geocortex Mobile App Framework’s iOS and Windows versions have been improved, and support for Android devices has been added at the request of our customers. All three editions contain an “online/offline” toggle button and indicator when paired with Geocortex Viewer for HTML5 2.4.

Here are the highlights of this major release:

Geocortex Essentials 4.3

  • Improvements to Instant Search to increase feature scanning speeds, recover errors and perform multiple service scans simultaneously
  • Instant Search can now scan secured services and services with coded value domains
  • Radio button layer behavior
  • Support for adding KML files to a site
  • Configurable copyright attribution for all service types
  • New Workflow activities and improvements
  • Layer security now supports related tables

Geocortex Viewer for HTML5 2.4

  • WCAG 2.0 AA compliance (including support for screen readers and mouseless navigation of user interface)
  • Completely new, upgraded handheld shell with a streamlined UX and improved UI
  • Applications with fewer tools can now be arranged in an optional compact toolbar
  • Pictometry® Extension for Geocortex Essentials is now an integrated, out-of-the-box feature
  • Export map image to a variety of image formats and include georeferenced image metadata
  • Display a configured overview map
  • Support for displaying, identifying and querying KML layers
  • Transition through multiple years of aerial imagery with a time-based basemap slider
  • New Feature Details view allows you to arrange the feature description, attributes, hyperlinks, charts, related records and attachments in top-left, top-right and bottom panels
  • Drill-down map tips return features from multiple layers beneath a clicked point
  • Fixed-position displays for map tips
  • Create sharable URLs with query parameters that preserve the current scale, map center, visible layers and selected theme
  • Allow application sharing via Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ and email
  • Export search, identify, query and measurement results to CSV, XLSX and shapefile formats
  • Configure search selection display text when no results can be found
  • Report mouse coordinates in map units, or lat/long in a variety of formats
  • Configurable application footer to store hyperlinks or dynamic controls (scalebar, mouse coordinates, social media links)
  • Automatically pan the map with tools that use shapes (lines, polygons, rectangles, etc.) when used near the edges of the map
  • Report coordinates in a status message when geolocation is invoked
  • Multi-tool widget allows grouping of similar tools into a fly-out menu
  • 3rd party map integration container allows docking maps from Bing, Pictometry® and other sources

As always, there are also numerous minor features, various bug fixes and user experience enhancements included as part of this release. We recommend you consult the release notes for more detailed information.

Note: There is interdependence between Geocortex Essentials and our HTML5 viewer; implementing some newly-introduced features will require the latest version of Geocortex Essentials.

Current Geocortex customers: Installers, release notes and supporting documentation can be downloaded by licensees with an active maintenance agreement from the Geocortex Support Center. If your account is handled by an authorized Geocortex Reseller, please contact your local representative for access to installers and documentation.

Customers interested in learning more about some of the new features being introduced can watch a set of new feature videos that are available for viewing in the Geocortex Support Center.

Not a Geocortex customer yet? Visit our Discovery Center and get in touch with us.


Winter 2013 Geocortex Training Schedule

Geocortex Boy Wonder

Geocortex Training helps you acquire the knowledge you need to make the most of your investment in Geocortex technology. We've recently developed new content and materials to ensure a greatly improved learning experience.

The new 2013 training schedule helps accommodate tight travel budgets and offers greater flexibility for participants across different time zones.

Introduction to Geocortex
This half day course provides a basic technical understanding of what you can accomplish using Geocortex, with an emphasis on Geocortex Essentials. Learn More

Getting Started with Geocortex Essentials
This two day course provides a great foundation for building and configuring solutions with Geocortex Essentials. Learn More

Developing Workflows for Geocortex Essentials
Building on Getting Started with Geocortex Essentials, this two day course dives into solving real-world business problems using Geocortex Workflow technology. Learn More

Upcoming Schedule

January and February workshop dates, along with more information and registration links, may be found on our Geocortex website.


Fall 2012 Geocortex Training Schedule

Geocortex Boy Wonder

We've recently completed a complete restructuring of the Geocortex training workshop curriculum, developing new content and materials to ensure a greatly improved learning experience. We've also updated our workshop schedule to provide more virtual training sessions in order to accommodate tight travel budgets and to offer greater flexibility for participants across different time zones. We're really excited about these three new workshops:

Introduction to Geocortex
This half day course provides a basic technical understanding of what you can accomplish using Geocortex, with an emphasis on Geocortex Essentials.
Learn More

Getting Started with Geocortex Essentials
This two day course provides a great foundation for building and configuring solutions with Geocortex Essentials.
Learn More

Developing Workflows for Geocortex Essentials
Building on Getting Started with Geocortex Essentials, this two day course dives into solving real-world business problems using Geocortex Workflow technology.
Learn More

Upcoming Schedule

The full 2012 training schedule, covering dates from September through December, may be found on our website.