Showing 4 result(s) for tag: web gis

Delivering accessible mapping applications for everyone [Geocortex Tech Tip]

Accessibility has become a top-of-mind topic for businesses, government agencies, and developers of technology in recent years; U.S. legislation like Section 508, which requires inclusivity for end-users of all abilities, has emerged in recent years and historic exemptions for web mapping have been eliminated.

Since 2015, Geocortex Viewer for HTML5 has been accessible out-of-the-box and meets the criteria to be Web Content Accessibility Guideline (WCAG) AA compliant, without requiring administrators to undertake complicated and onerous configuration or development. In this week’s Tech Tip, Garrett takes a closer look at screen reader support, keyboard navigation, and other accessibility features that ship with Geocortex Viewer for HTML5.

Watch on YouTube

 

Video Transcription

“Hi my name is Garrett, I work on the Product Experience Design team here at Geocortex. Today we’re going to take a look at some of the accessibility features included in our viewers. You don’t need to do anything to configure these – they’re all included out-of-the-box with every viewer implementation.

Geocortex Viewer for HTML5 is accessible and meets WCAG AA standards. This has taken a lot of work on our part to look at many different things, from color contrast to screen reader support to keyboard navigation.

Let me show you how keyboard navigation works in [Geocortex Viewer for HTML5]. First, we have skip links. When you first come to our viewer and use the tab key to navigate throughout the application, the first time you hit “tab” you’ll be presented with what we call skip links. This gives you quick shortcuts to jump to popular portions of our viewer.

The skip links allow you to jump to other regions in our application without having to tab through each individual, clickable item. If we wanted to jump straight to the tool bar, we just tab over and hit enter. Now once the toolbar is open, we can navigate through the different tabs on the toolbar to find an individual tool that we want to use.

Let’s try drawing a polygon on the map. When we activate the drawing tools with keyboards, we have activated “accessibility drawing mode”. Once we’ve activated the polygon drawing tool, our focus is now on the map, as indicated by the purple line around the map. We can now draw on the map using the keyboard.

Hitting Enter will drop a marker in the center of the map extent, and we can control the position using the arrow keys on the keyboard. Hitting Enter will drop a vertex on the map, from which now we can move our cursor around with the keyboard. Hitting Enter again will drop another vertex. If you find that the increments with which the keyboard moves around is too large, you can hold the Alt key and you get a more fine-grained control over where you want to drop the vertex.

Hitting Enter again will complete the shape, and now we can edit this shape using the keyboard shortcut “V”: we can cycle through all the vertices, which we can move. Holding Shift+V will cycle the vertices in reverse order. Between each vertex, another handle will get added that we can then drag out to edit the shape, which will add more handles that we can edit. When we’re done drawing the shape, hit Enter again to complete the shape. And now your shape is drawn on the map. If you hit Enter again, you can draw a second shape. And that’s how you draw on the map with the keyboard.

Another great accessibility feature in our viewers is screen reader support. Geocortex Viewer for HTML5 supports the combination of Firefox with the NVDA screen reader. The screen reader will read aloud changes in the application, links, text, map location, those sorts of things.

In combination with some of the keyboard support, we can navigate through the viewer and the visually impaired will have the benefit of a screen reader reading out the context and instructions to them. Let’s try a couple examples here.

[Screen reader reading results]

Now know that we can perform a search because the screen reader has read out those instructions for us. So, let’s perform a simple search.

[Screen reader reading results]

After we perform the search, the screen reader read out that we’ve closed the home panel and opened the search results panel. We can tab through here to hear other instructions.

[Screen reader reading results]

As you could hear, as we zoom to all the features in the feature collection, the screen reader read out the coordinates and extent change on the map to keep users centered with where the map is now located.

To learn more about accessibility with our viewers, you can visit our Documentation Center at docs.geocortex.com. Just search for “accessibility” and you can read all about accessibility in our viewers, including a detailed list of all the keyboard shortcuts to help you navigate through applications with just the keyboard.”

​You can learn more about Geocortex Essentials accessibility features in our 2017 webinar, which is available on YouTube here.


Getting started with forms in Geocortex Workflow 5 [Geocortex Tech Tip]

You hear us talk a lot about the importance of keeping your end-users in mind when developing GIS tools and applications; we built Geocortex Workflow 5 to help you improve user experience by allowing you to guide end-users through complex business processes in simple, intuitive ways, which is largely achieved through forms for capturing user inputs.

The improved forms offered with Geocortex Workflow 5 go beyond just simple text inputs; you can present users with checkboxes, dropdown menus, and geometry and file pickers. In this Geocortex Tech Tip, Ryan shows you how to get started and build your first form for deployment inside Geocortex or Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS.

Watch on YouTube

 

Video Transcript

“Hi, I’m Ryan, and I’m a Product Manager at Latitude. Today I’m going to show you how to get started and build your first form with Geocortex Workflow 5. Let’s get started.

One of the main uses of [Geocortex] Workflow is to create an experience that guides the end-user through some sort of business process. Typically, what that means is that we are presenting forms to the user so that we can capture inputs from them, then pass on to the rest of our workflow, which actually executes the business logic based on the data the user provided. So, an indispensable tool in [Geocortex] Workflow is the “display form” activity, available here in the tool box.

To get started, just drag [the “display form” activity] onto the design area and connect it to the flow chart. Now we have a workflow that contains one “display form” activity. If I double click that activity, it opens the form designer experience. We can see here that I have a header that contains my title, and a footer that’s got some buttons in it for “submit” and “cancel”. So that’s what we have by default.

I can change the title of the form if I want to "My form". And if I wanted to, I could change the buttons around to “back” and “next” instead of “submit” and “cancel” or add and remove buttons as needed.

And then we’ve got a selection of form inputs that we can choose from, depending on what type of information we need to capture. So, just starting with something simple, a textbox, we can drag that onto the [design area]. And let’s say that we wanted to create an address entry form. I can change that textbox’s title to just be “address”. And if I want a little description underneath that, I could put something like “enter an address” in there and it shows up.

There’s even some cool things that we can support, like markdown, to make it have some improved formatting. If I wanted bold or italics, or things like that, that’s available. And I can supply a value.

Okay, so that’s sort of a basic input that we’ve fleshed out. There’s also all kinds of other things that we can add. If I wanted radio groups or check box groups, dropdown lists, all sorts of things are possible in here. And even things like a geometry picker is going to allow the end-user to draw a shape or multiple shapes on the map. File pickers can [also be used to] capture pictures from phones and things like that. All these different items are available in here.

So now what we do is, I’m going to hit “Ctrl+S” to save this and am going to demonstrate this form running in our sandbox application. So, we can see this workflow running with various Esri APIs - in this case just a 2D map. Here’s the form showing up, as it was designed. There’s my text input, I’ve got radio buttons that we didn’t bother to configure, I’ve got a geometry picker that’s going to allow me to draw a shape on the map. All that information is available just from that, the simple clicks that set-up that form.

And the last thing I’ll show here is a couple real applications. This is just a sandbox for testing, but if we were to look at WebApp Builder [for ArcGIS], I can connect to a widget that’s going to run that workflow.

Here’s that exact same form running from the workflow I just edited, available here. That’s a 2D Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS application, and then here’s a 3D one that runs a completely different viewer and a completely different layout that’s being used, but it runs just the same, so we can get our forms rendered and we can start capturing input.

That [should be] enough to get you started. Stay tuned for future [Tech Tips] where we look at how we can get this data out of the form and pass it on to our workflow process.”


GIS Health Assessment: A new way to think about your system

When we think about the health of our GIS, many of us are used to beginning with the infrastructure. After all, it is what drives the technical performance of your system. The problem with starting at the infrastructure level, though, is that it’s difficult to get a complete picture of which aspects of the GIS are most important to your users.

While the GIS infrastructure is extremely important, not all the resources in your environment are created equal. You might have some layers or services that are used 3-4 times a week, and others that are accessed thousands of times each week. While you want to do all you can to ensure the entire system is performing as it should, there are only so many hours in a day. With an infrastructure-first approach, you’re often unable to hone in on what the most important apps, layers, services, servers, and ArcGIS instances are. 

 

A new way to think about GIS health

It’s time we flip the traditional infrastructure-first approach and begin thinking about GIS health through the lens of end-user productivity. Your GIS is there to help your users do their jobs, so that’s where your analysis should start.

Whether it’s explicitly or implicitly, you’re going to be measured on the productivity of the users you build apps for, not the response time of a specific server. Without the users, there is no need for the GIS infrastructure.

By starting with what your users are trying to accomplish, you’ll be able to map your key business processes and user flows to the GIS infrastructure and resources that are most important to supporting them. Looking at your GIS from users’ perspectives allows you to better understand how it is being used day-to-day and identify the critical resources needed to support your monitoring and optimization efforts.

With so many moving pieces in your GIS, you don’t have time to treat everything equally.  Focusing your efforts will let you be much more productive and spend more time working on high-value activities.

When we talk about a user-first approach to GIS health, there are two major areas that you need to be considering:

Performance: While closely tied to infrastructure performance, what we mean here is the performance of your end-users. Are they able to do their jobs effectively with the tools and applications you’re building? Are your users taking longer than expected to complete certain tasks?

When these things crop up, a user-first approach will help you target your efforts and fix issues quicker. A good example would be if an application had a poorly performing layer. This would be an infrastructure performance issue, but if you understand what specific layers and services are used in that application, you will know where to look to address the issue.

Usability: If your GIS infrastructure is performing as expected, the next area to examine is usability. Usability is all about whether your applications are configured and designed in a way that makes sense for what your users need to do. Strong infrastructure performance combined with poor usability is still poor performance (remember, performance is about end-user performance, not infrastructure).

An example of how usability can affect performance is when a common tool is not in a prominent location in your app. If it’s difficult to find, users will waste time looking for it, take longer to complete a task by using a different method, or abandon it entirely. This is also true when incorrect layers are loaded by default – users end up wasting time searching for the layers they need.

Completing a user-first health assessment

Once you’ve adopted a user-first approach to GIS health, you’re ready to perform a user-first health assessment. What you’re trying to accomplish is mapping out the business processes and use cases that you manage with your GIS to the specific GIS resources that support them.

First, you’ll want to identify the different user groups that leverage your GIS. By user group, we mean a group of users that have common work patterns and engagement with your applications. This could be a group of people (or one person) with the same task in your head office, or it could be a specific field crew that uses an app on a tablet. The key here is to identify people who use the GIS in similar ways.

We’ve created a checklist to help you perform a health assessment; it’ll help you map what your different user groups need to accomplish to the GIS resources and infrastructure required to support their work.

The checklist contains areas to detail the users and what they need to do, the app(s) they use, the most-used layers, the services the app(s) consume, which ArcGIS products are used and how they’re configured, and the server(s) that support it.

Get your GIS health assessment checklist now  

What to do with your health assessment

Once you’ve completed your GIS health assessment, you can use the information you’ve gathered to proactively monitor the GIS resources that are the most important. Tools like Geocortex Analytics allow you to configure personalized dashboards that provide a snapshot of the resources you want to monitor.

You can also configure alarms and notifications in some systems monitoring tools. Because you know what you need to monitor, you can set thresholds for warning signs of potential issues and have notifications sent to your email.

Next, identify anomalies among your use patterns. If certain users are performing notably better or worse than the average, you can dive into the specifics of how those individuals are using the applications you’ve built. Replicate the superior use patterns and examine the weaker patterns to gauge if there is a potential gap in training or understanding of certain functions.

If you want to learn how all of this is possible with Geocortex Analytics, we’d like the chance to show you! We’ve recently added great new features (including individual user reporting) and made significant improvements to performance and reliability. Get in touch with us using the button below.

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Esri's 2017 Partner Conference and DevSummit

Earlier this month I had the pleasure of checking out Esri’s Partner Conference (EPC) and DevSummit in Palm Springs, where Esri shares their plans and technology direction for the year ahead. Latitude Geographics has attended the EPC and DevSummit for the past 13 years; although I have been with Latitude for 16 years, this was the first time I took part. As the lead Business Analyst on our ArcGIS Implementation Services team, it was a particularly great year for me to be there and take in all of the information Esri had to offer.

I took some time to go through my notes from this year’s event, and wanted to share with the Geocortex community what I saw as 2017’s main themes.

 

Unification of the ArcGIS message

One thing that stood out immediately to me was that the ArcGIS message has consolidated under the umbrella of the new ArcGIS Enterprise terminology (introduced at ArcGIS 10.5). In recent years, I’d heard about individual components of the ArcGIS platform – Portal for ArcGIS, ArcGIS for Server, and the rest of the individual stack components; while all the individual components are still there and still very powerful, the updated messaging around ArcGIS Enterprise has simplified things and brought everything together. Each “piece” feels much more like contributing technologies to a cohesive whole, rather than individual software components.

Maturity of the ArcGIS platform

Related to the unification theme above, there is a noticeable increase in maturity of the complete ArcGIS platform. Some exciting capabilities have started to come into their own over the past year (e.g. ArcGIS Insights and ArcGIS GeoAnalytics Server), and this maturity makes the ArcGIS platform an even more compelling, comprehensive GIS solution. Single-user, high-power desktop GIS isn’t exactly what I’d call a dinosaur just yet, but it’s sure looking grey compared to the new distributed and connected GIS computing paradigm Esri has introduced.

On-premises options for ArcGIS Enterprise

During the DevSummit this year, it seemed to me that there was a heavy focus on on-premises options for ArcGIS Enterprise. ArcGIS Online was still a focus, but I expect that the attention towards on-premises installation, configuration, tuning and management is reflective of the number of organizations that simply need to host their GIS infrastructure themselves. I probably shouldn’t use the term ‘on-premises’ -- quite often ArcGIS Enterprise is best implemented inside Amazon Web Services (AWS) or Azure – ‘self-hosted’ is perhaps better terminology.

Discovering useful tools and tactics

Finally, I must say that so much of the value for me at this year’s Partner Conference and DevSummit was all the bits of information I picked up related to many different areas of the Esri ecosystem. From learning about tools that I wasn’t aware of (like Koop), to valuable brainstorming and UX wireframing techniques, to tips and tricks for working with Geodatabases (hello extracting coded value domains!), this year’s event was a treasure chest of useful nuggets of information.

I can’t wait to see what else Esri has in store for us, and I look forward to working with our customers on more successful ArcGIS and Geocortex implementations as the year continues to unfold!