Showing 3 result(s) for tag: customer story

Alberta Energy Regulator: Supporting safe and responsible energy resource operations

Alberta Energy Regulator: Supporting safe and responsible energy resource operations

The Alberta Energy Regulator (AER) is a regulatory body that’s responsible for overseeing oil, oil sands, natural gas, and coral project lifecycles. Their mandate is to provide safe, orderly and efficient development of energy resources across the province of Alberta.

A few years ago, the AER took on the additional task of regulating reclamation and remediation activities for all of Alberta’s energy resource operations, which was previously managed by the Alberta government ministry, Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP).

Taking on this responsibility came with a backlog of nearly 2,700 upstream oil and gas reclamation certificate applications. The backlog was caused due to a very complex process that required each application to be checked against seven different databases – ultimately leading to a significant amount of manual analysis.

 

The AER collaborated with the Geocortex Professional Services team to put together a system called OneStop, a program that ensures all criteria for reclamation are properly vetted in a timely fashion by introducing two review levels (one of which is automated) and freeing the AER of resources which could then be allocated towards more high-risk areas.

As soon as OneStop was launched, roughly 80% of the backlog was processed instantly. By utilizing Geocortex Essentials, AER staff were able to extend their ArcGIS functionality with customizable workflows, tools and features, and configurability with other systems, leading to a massive reduction in production time. Additionally, Geocortex Essentials also enabled the AER to integrate with existing enterprise systems quickly and intuitively.

This process has not only allowed the AER to streamline their processes and improve on transparency, but it also led to them receiving an Esri Canada Award of Excellence for leveraging GIS technology to serve a vital part of Alberta’s economy more efficiently.

Read the full Alberta Energy Regulator customer story here.

 


Celebrating GIS Day with York Regional Police: How GIS Data Has Mitigated Risk & Increased Efficiency in Crime Prevention

Today marks the 20th anniversary of International GIS Day! At Geocortex we’re always inspired by the positive stories were hear from our customers who are using GIS in new and innovative ways to help make the world a better place to live.

We recently caught up with Greg Stanisci of the York Regional Police to chat with him about their use of Active Operating Picture, an extension for Geocortex Essentials that helps respond to emergency situations with reliable information.

 

How were your operations being carried out prior to making the decision to integrate a GIS solution?

Greg Stanisci [GS]: Before integrating our Active Operating Picture (AOP) solution, our Real-Time Operation Centre (RTOC) had to go hunting for data on important issues, which meant they were seeking data all day long. Now, our GIS solution gives us that data immediately, helping us identify priority calls and better manage our resources, so the overall impact has been an increase in efficiencies and a reduction in the risks associated with the lack of awareness around not always knowing what our priorities are.

What were some of your GIS goals prior to adopting the YRP Active Operating Picture?

[GS]: We believed that mapping technology was one of the best ways to visualize police information and bridge communication between our officers. Everything we do is location-based, and we wanted to interconnect GIS with our team of analysts, investigators, front line officers, supervisors and senior officers to better collaborate and respond to situations.

It was our goal to support a more data-driven strategy that revolved around utilizing our resources in the most efficient way possible. Ultimately, we wanted to empower our force with data, and use that data to drive the way we plan our operations.

Can you explain how York Regional Police is currently deploying AOP technology?

[GS]: In a nutshell, we’re using AOP to provide more information in real time to and from the many different members on our team. This ranges from a variety of different applications such as enhancing road safety, preventing crimes before they happen, locating missing people, and accessing information about known offenders. AOP enables us to better streamline the way these processes are managed.

Additionally, the analytics we use in AOP helps us analyze our police presence in a given area to gain more insight into historical deployment patterns, giving us the ability to plan future front line deployment more strategically based on the data we’re receiving.

Describe your how AOP supports your Real-Time Operation Centre (RTOC).

[GS]: One of the primary functions of the RTOC is to mitigate risks to officers in our community. Thanks to AOP, our operatives no longer need to seek important information like priority calls and other alerts, how many units are assigned and whether officers arrived at their destination safely – the information is delivered to them directly.

AOP gives us visibility into which of our officers are currently in the field, the sectors they’ve been assigned to, whether they’re responding to a call, as well as the details of the call itself. AOP also warns us when a patrol sector is empty so that we can actively manage that risk as well. This helps us empower the people within the RTOC with more information, so they can better support our officers.

We’ve worked with our RTOC team to compile a list of roughly thirty different types of priority calls. These priorities can be displayed very quickly and easily for them to respond to as they occur.

How has AOP technology been used to better deal with countering crime in the York Region?

[GS]: AOP technology has allowed us to make more intelligent and proactive decisions with our resourcing. We’re able to put officers in the right place, at the right time. We’re also training officers to analyze the various data points, like heatmaps, to better understand where they’re most needed. AOP helps us leverage location based data to identify priority patrol zones for officers, like areas that have higher gun violence or gang activity as an example.

What have been some success stories that have occurred since onboarding AOP?

[GS]: We’ve diffused quite a few situations since we’ve started using AOP. It has been used to ID suspects that committed a string of commercial break and enters, including a string of thefts that took place at various liquor stores. The technology allowed us to link together a series of prescription fraud cases, ultimately helping us identify the suspects. We were also able to make key arrests to several wanted persons due to the data we were able to relay in AOP.

Thanks to AOP, our ROTC -- as well as front-line officers -- are able to help deter crimes happening in real-time, such as a terrorist threat at Canada's Wonderland amusement park, and a bank robbery that was in progress.

Have all your officers been trained on the technology?

[GS]: Currently, all frontline officers and investigators have been trained on AOP technology. AOP is being used in both their cars and on their desktops. There are also some civilian administrative groups that are using AOP for planning and crime analysis purposes.

Thanks Greg! One final question - are there any plans for further use of GIS in future applications?

[GS]: We’re hoping to get further use of the “after action playback” mode, which can playback events and how units responded throughout the day. This can provide context on where our zones were created and the maps we drew to better assess how we dealt with a response.

It is also our hope to soon run workflows that convert individual unit points to lines to see how our officers and platoons drove during that date. This will give us a better idea on exactly where we were patrolling on a street level and determine which neighborhoods require a heightened presence.

Another future idea we had in mind was to develop a site to track bail checks that are done by officers on the road. This would allow an officer to use a form that would then update on the map, preventing duplicate checks from taking place in a day.

Finally, we’d like to explore how our officers’ GPS alerts are generated based on if they’re in a priority zone or near know offenders or other types of hazards.

GIS Day In Your Community

Every year on November 14th, GIS Day gives us a special opportunity to turn the world into a forum for one day, advocating the impact that geographic technology has on our everyday lives in ways that we may have otherwise taken for granted. Around the world, organizations host educational sessions to spread information, solutions and knowledge on how GIS is improving operations everywhere to make our cities cleaner, safer, better resourced and more efficient.

For more information on GIS Day, we recommend visiting the official website. It offers plenty of information about GIS events happening in your communities, as well as treasure trove of valuable resources.

We invite you to share your GIS Day stories with us in the comments section below!


Bay Area Rapid Transit: Improving Efficiency and Simplifying Critical Business Processes

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) is a public transportation system serving four counties in the San Francisco Bay Area; their rapid transit system operates 46 stations across 112 miles of track, with an estimated average ridership in 2016 of 433,000 trips per weekday, and close to 129 million trips for the entire year.

For more than four decades, BART has been an efficient and reliable way for San Francisco’s Bay Area Residents to commute: what began as a futuristic dream in 1972 has grown to be a vital part of the regional culture and economy. 

 

A major challenge BART faced was how to manage the ongoing need for track maintenance and repairs. They were following a paper-based system, which was inefficient and labor intensive. Each time the track had to undergo maintenance, Track Allocation staff had to complete and submit a detailed paper form, which took more than half an hour to complete and often had transcription errors.

They were able to solve this problem with a Geocortex application called the Track Allocation System (TAS) that leverages Geocortex Workflow and Geocortex Reporting technology. Track Allocation staff can now simply draw a box on the map to select the area and assets where the work needs to occur, and the workflow running in the back-end automatically populates a Track Allocation Request Form.

A process that used to take more than 30 minutes now takes a matter of seconds to complete. The TAS was implemented in March 2016 and already has a user base of more than 160 employees, who have recorded more than 7,000 track allocation requests.

Read the full Bay Area Rapid Transit customer story here.